Monthly Archives: February 2013

Markus Miessen, Chantal Mouffe, and the Nightmare of Participation

I recently found copies of two books in Miessen’s series of books on participation, collaboration, and democracy. The first presents his thoughts, along with other viewpoints, on the problematic of participation when it is shrouded with goals of consensus and

Markus Miessen, Chantal Mouffe, and the Nightmare of Participation

I recently found copies of two books in Miessen’s series of books on participation, collaboration, and democracy. The first presents his thoughts, along with other viewpoints, on the problematic of participation when it is shrouded with goals of consensus and

Teddy Bear Patriarchy

This is a great read. Below is my summary and review. Haraway is epic! She makes the most eloquent and witty writers read as simply as Vonnegut or Hemingway. *D. Haraway, Primate Visions (New York: Routledge, 1989), Ch. 3 (“Teddy Bear

Teddy Bear Patriarchy

This is a great read. Below is my summary and review. Haraway is epic! She makes the most eloquent and witty writers read as simply as Vonnegut or Hemingway. *D. Haraway, Primate Visions (New York: Routledge, 1989), Ch. 3 (“Teddy Bear

Foucault, Norms, Discipline and Power

“Like surveillance and with it, normalization becomes one of the great instruments of power at the end of the classical age. For the marks that once indicated status, privilege and affiliation were increasingly replace — or at least supplemented —

Foucault, Norms, Discipline and Power

“Like surveillance and with it, normalization becomes one of the great instruments of power at the end of the classical age. For the marks that once indicated status, privilege and affiliation were increasingly replace — or at least supplemented —

Have we ever been modern?

Reading Bruno Latour, for me, is like deciphering a code. I have to re-read Greek mythology, re-formulate the typical associations to words I create, and start to re-understand the world.  But this is a good thing.  After finishing We Have Never

Have we ever been modern?

Reading Bruno Latour, for me, is like deciphering a code. I have to re-read Greek mythology, re-formulate the typical associations to words I create, and start to re-understand the world.  But this is a good thing.  After finishing We Have Never

Gentrification is good. New urbanism is the tool for positive development.

A friend of mine recently sent me a quite discouraging article by Andres Duany that appeared in the journal American Enterprise. The short version reads as the title of this post. His title is worse, even more short-sighted and apolitical:

Gentrification is good. New urbanism is the tool for positive development.

A friend of mine recently sent me a quite discouraging article by Andres Duany that appeared in the journal American Enterprise. The short version reads as the title of this post. His title is worse, even more short-sighted and apolitical:

Why are we talking about cats as killers? Mini nukes are the future? Beyonce caused the power outage?

There is a story in national media, filtering down to the local media, that cat’s are nature’s greatest invasive species, killing by the millions.  And that Beyonce did an amazing job performing at the Super Bowl. My question is: why

Why are we talking about cats as killers? Mini nukes are the future? Beyonce caused the power outage?

There is a story in national media, filtering down to the local media, that cat’s are nature’s greatest invasive species, killing by the millions.  And that Beyonce did an amazing job performing at the Super Bowl. My question is: why

Do demographics matter for “The Right to the City” movement?

In this post a couple of days ago on the Huffington Post, the reporter discusses the  Occupy Wall Street movement and a study which revealed that the demographics of people involved might be surprising: young, white, employed males made up

Do demographics matter for “The Right to the City” movement?

In this post a couple of days ago on the Huffington Post, the reporter discusses the  Occupy Wall Street movement and a study which revealed that the demographics of people involved might be surprising: young, white, employed males made up